Gardening

Rediscovered chard


Used in many Mediterranean recipes, chard is one of those vegetables, once forgotten, which are making a comeback.

Prolific, they are easy to grow in the vegetable garden.

  • To read: how to grow chard well

Different varieties of chard

Green to cut, white, curly to white card, to red card ... The varieties of chard, this biennial herb from the beet family, is not lacking. Also called "perry", it has large green leaves whose charms (or ribs), i.e. the petiole and veins, take on different colors depending on the species.

The leaf blade is cooked and chopped like spinach (it is found in particular in the chard pie popular in the South), when the ribs are served fried, steamed or au gratin with béchamel. Note: the colored ribs are more fragrant than the white ones, with a sweet taste similar to that of beetroot.

Sowing and harvesting chard

Seeds can be sown in the spring, April through May, for a July harvest, or in the summer for a fall harvest. Sow in rows 1 cm deep and thin out the rows when the plants show a few leaves. Swiss chard appreciate fresh, deep soil enriched with ripe compost. In summer, water the base of the seedlings to allow them to take root well.

  • Harvesting is done with scissors according to your needs, as with salads.

Before the first frost, cut the leaves at ground level. In the event of negative temperatures, protect the plants under covers. In the spring, they will offer you young leaves that you can eat raw in salads. Then let the plants rise to seeds so that they reseed themselves on their own thanks to the wind.

  • Be careful not to install beets close to avoid poorly edible hybridization.

L. H.

Video: Sautéed Swiss Chard with Lemon Zest (October 2020).