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In the cabbage family, Romanesco cabbage


Thanks to its original form, Romanesco cabbage makes an impression despite its very late release on international markets.

Its apple-green color is reminiscent of broccoli. Its compact shape is more like cauliflower. Romanesco cabbage is a variety in its own right that is still little consumed in France. Still, the vegetable is an excellent source of vitamins, minerals and fiber.

Its caloric intake is low so it is obviously appreciated in a balanced diet.

  • Read also: how to grow Romanesco cabbage properly

Long reserved for the Romans

As the name suggests, Romanesco cabbage was developed in Rome. Its culture in the Italian capital is very old. However, it was not until the 1990s that the rest of the world learned of its existence. Dutch researchers are the first to experiment with its cultivation outside the Roman region.

Since then, Brittany (and in particular the regions of Saint-Pol-de-Léon and Paimpol), has taken the monopoly of French vegetable production. However, Romanesco cabbage is still struggling to make itself known to gourmets.

Raw or steamed

Available from June to September, romanesco cabbage most often eaten cooked. Prefer a rapid steam cooking, seven minutes maximum, in order to retain a maximum of nutrients.

More original, it can also be tasted raw, in a salad. After rinsing it, peel the tops to make a sort of tabbouleh, for example. Keep the core to serve chopped and cooked in another recipe.

On the shelves, it is better to choose unblemished cabbages with a firm head. Give preference to inflorescences with fine and tight grains.

Eat the vegetable quickly to get the most out of its nutritional value. Otherwise, keep it for a maximum of 3 days in the vegetable drawer of the refrigerator.

Mathematics learning tool

Many famous scientists owe their discovery to the observation of nature.

Thus, the organization of the inflorescences of Romanesco cabbage is the illustration of a principle well known in mathematics, the fractal.

M.B.


Visual credits: Chou romanesco 1: © Illustrez-vous - stock.adobe.com Chou romanesco 2: © Timolina - stock.adobe.com Chou romanesco 3: © Uliab - stock.adobe.com

Video: How To Chop Every Vegetable. Method Mastery. Epicurious (October 2020).